Yay! I’m not a heretic!

January 11, 2006 § 15 Comments

Gee, I’m glad to have that settled.

You scored as Chalcedon compliant. You are Chalcedon compliant. Congratulations, you’re not a heretic. You believe that Jesus is truly God and truly man and like us in every respect, apart from sin. Officially approved in 451.

Chalcedon compliant

100%

Adoptionist

50%

Nestorianism

50%

Modalism

42%

Apollanarian

33%

Monophysitism

33%

Monarchianism

33%

Albigensianism

25%

Pelagianism

25%

Socinianism

17%

Arianism

0%

Donatism

0%

Gnosticism

0%

Docetism

0%

Are you a heretic?
created with QuizFarm.com

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§ 15 Responses to Yay! I’m not a heretic!

  • Wow, aside from Gnosticism, I don’t know what ANY of those mean.

  • eric_hinkle says:

    Well, the Nestorians are a/the church in Central Asia. More than that I don’t know.
    Pelagianism argued that God’s forgiveness for our sins was unnecessary, as we could win Christ’s redemption on our own.
    Arianism stated that Christ was the most holy of human beings, but he was not ‘of God’ as God is One, therefor the Trinity is a false concept.
    That’s all I can remember right now, though I could be wrong about those definitions.

  • You scored as Pelagianism.
    You are a Pelagian. You reject ideas about man’s fallen human nature and believe that as a result we are able to fully obey God. You are the first Briton to contribute significantly to Christian thought, but you’re still excommunicated in 417.

  • akelavincent says:

    Yay, me neither!

    You scored as Chalcedon compliant. You are Chalcedon compliant. Congratulations, you’re not a heretic. You believe that Jesus is truly God and truly man and like us in every respect, apart from sin. Officially approved in 451.

    Chalcedon compliant

    100%

    Pelagianism

    67%

    Nestorianism

    67%

    Modalism

    58%

    Adoptionist

    42%

    Monarchianism

    42%

    Monophysitism

    33%

    Apollanarian

    17%

    Arianism

    8%

    Socinianism

    8%

    Donatism

    8%

    Gnosticism

    8%

    Docetism

    0%

    Albigensianism

    0%

    Are you a heretic?created with QuizFarm.com

  • Wow, heresy sure is complicated business!

  • DT says:

    Yeah, same here. I’ve made a study of the early church, and still have only heard of the Donatists, Arianism, and Pelagianism. geezz… And they don’t even have those wacky Montanists. hehehe, but that’s probably because many denominations today are based (very loosely) on montanist teachings– such as the Catholics and Pentecostals… *shrug*
    Oh well, we are supposed to study the true teachings, not the counterfeits anyway, right?

  • DT says:

    Hmmm… Doesn’t it make you think?

  • DT says:

    heh, and yet, I am sure there are more out there…
    I thought it was funny that they didn’t go back to the decisions made at the Council of Nicea. The whole reason that council was called was to put down heresy. Odd.

  • eric_hinkle says:

    And they don’t even have those wacky Montanists. hehehe, but that’s probably because many denominations today are based (very loosely) on montanist teachings– such as the Catholics and Pentecostals
    I doubt the Catholics retain anything significant from Montanist thought (he was the one who argued that any sin after baptism condemned you to hell without chance of forgiveness, I believe?). At least, those Catholics I’ve spoken to who know about Montanus have stated as much.

  • DT says:

    Go Us!
    I wonder what it means that we scored in those other heretical sects… Some of the questions I wasn’t sure if I believed, so I just put a kinda “maybe” response… Now i want to go back and examine the quiz again, especially the ones I was unsure of.

  • DT says:

    One of the most prominent teachings of the Montanists was that God gives continued revelation, beyond scripture. They used to go into these “ecstatic visions” and have some doozies of prophesies, generally changing or tweaking scripture– making things generally harder. So a lot that has been “added” is generally in the Montanist tradition of adding things, if not directly linked to them. I heard someone teach that some mainstream denominations claim montanist roots, and he included the catholics, siting that particular peculiarity.
    Of course, no one today seems to be as strict about actually following the letter of the Law so to speak like those montanists. As you said, they taught that any sin after baptism condemns one to hell. Can you imagine the level of righteousness Christians were living at at the time for him to make that leap?
    I personally think we as Christians are waaay too lax about sin in our lives today. But I know better than to make a statement like Montanus’.

  • akelavincent says:

    Re: Go Us!
    Yeah, I know… on some of the questions, I wasn’t sure I knew what they were asking, or maybe I understood the question, but it seemed to be a “tip of the iceberg” thing, and I wasn’t so sure about the rest of the iceberg. So it was kinda, “Umm… I think I agree, but…” It’s worth pondering, anyway.

  • DT says:

    Re: Go Us!
    So it was kinda, “Umm… I think I agree, but…” It’s worth pondering, anyway.
    And y’know, I think that’s how heresy gets started. A person thinks they understand, but…
    That’s rather like the slippery slope that the church got on by the Council of Nicea, I think. The fact that Constantine insisted they come up with a uniform creed forced the church to “put in writing” things that had been handed down orally for centuries. And then there was dispute over the wording, and by having things worded a certain way, some people read further (tho unintended) meaning, or at least, the door was opened for this to happen. For instance, it was at the Council of Chalcedon (which apparently we are aligned with) that the phrase “born of the virgin Mary, Mother of God” was added to the creed. And we know what that phrase (which by itself wasn’t really objectionable– it’s literally true, in a sense) has meant to the Catholic church. The original writers of the creed never intended for that to mean that Mary was a diety, equal to God. But such is the price one pays when creeds and councils go nuts.

  • It’s an internet quiz. And the vast majority of the questions were so bizarre from my point of view, that I had to just click the disagree box. I don’t put much stock in the results– it’s an internet quiz. Just like the ones that say things like my internal color is blue or I’m a fire spirit, or I’m Galadriel or Hermione or whatever. Nothing to take seriously at all.

  • DT says:

    *shrug* whether it’s an internet quiz or not, it’s good to ask yourself if that is what you really believe. If that’s *not* what you believe, eh– whatever. If it *is* what you believe, well then, perhaps it’s worth pondering a bit. I’d be perturbed to be told that what I believed was considered heresy. I’d want to know why, and what for.
    And while I don’t take the quiz seriously myself– I didn’t even know what some of those questions meant— it has inspired me to learn more about it, so to speak. Chalcedon compliant? Heck, if I’ve got to be compliant with a council, I’d rather it be the council at Jerusalem in Acts 15, quite honestly!

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