Sign me up!

July 27, 2009 § 23 Comments

Oh, and BTW

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§ 23 Responses to Sign me up!

  • DT says:

    Have I told you how much I LOLZ every time you use this icon??

  • lijuun says:

    Yeah, I love this one. I got it here, where she made a bunch of others: http://community.livejournal.com/sheer_elegance/21196.html?style=mine#cutid1
    I just now noticed your link at the end about how Baxter has gotten all kinds of immunity. I’d heard about it before, and it just PISSES ME OFF.
    Grrrrr . . .

  • DT says:

    Yay! I have it too!
    The whole thing makes me angry. I was on the fence about vaxing Ella, and at the very least, planning to delay until she was two. But the more I read and learn, the less I want to do it at all.
    It’s another Big Pharma racket.

  • lijuun says:

    Re: Yay! I have it too!
    Oh, don’t do it! My nephew is autistic and we believe quite firmly that it’s from his vaccinations. I’ve spent a lot of time researching it and it’s just too scary for words. Not just autism, but tons of auto-immune disorders and other things happen. If I ever end up having kids, they’ll only be vaccinated over my dead body.
    OK, /rant. 🙂

  • At the risk of starting an argument, this video is incorrect on at least one point. Thimerasol, the preservative chemical containing mercury hasn’t been used in vaccines since the mid-1990s.

  • lijuun says:

    Actually, a few do still use Thimerasol, and those that don’t use it do still use other mercury-containing chemicals (basically a similar version or “off-brand” version). In fact, a few months ago I started seeing news reports in papers and on TV news that mercury is actually good for kids, so we should be grateful that it’s included in the vaccines. Which is ridiculous.

  • kengara says:

    That’s weird… I easily found a list of ingredients here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/additives.htm

  • kengara says:

    Wouldn’t you worry that she might get scary diseases though?

  • DT says:

    Not especially. I have a lot of issues with our current vaxing system and schedule, and think there are plenty of risks that just seem to be swept under the carpet.
    A lot of our conventional wisdom regarding microbes, the spread of infection and disease, and how to prevent it were of course (as you full well know) the results of the study and theories of Louis Pasteur. There were other contemporary scientists conducting similar studies who disputed his conclusions in his day. But he had Napoleon’s funding and backing, so HIS results became the words we now live by.
    It seems to me that science and medicine have always been inextricably linked to money and politics, and that is NEVER in the best interests of the consumer/patient. I’m no longer convinced that either pasteurization or vaccination are effective or helpful tools for today’s world, and I am becoming more and more convinced that had funding been reversed to Antione Bechamp instead of Pasteur, the way we treat and prevent disease would be quite different.
    Bechamp has already been proven right when he posited that Pasteur’s methods would lead to permutations of microbes and diseases, leading to bigger badder bugs, like we now deal with today.

  • DT says:

    I think the point was that the ingredients are not given with the shot– unlike a Snapple Ice Tea, in which must be labeled before it can be sold/consumed.

  • DT says:

    posted this link to the CDC website, which lists Thimerasol as a “common ingredient” in vaccines.
    I hear conflicting stories on both side with pro-vaxers saying it’s not in there and the other side saying it is. According to the CDC it’s still common.

  • kengara says:

    Oh ok. What are you going to do instead of pasteurization and vaccination to keep Ella healthy?

  • kengara says:

    Yeah, maybe… but it doesn’t seem analogous. I mean, with food, you might have allergies or other health interests so you would need the ingredients to determine whether you should eat a certain food, but with vaccines, your doctor would presumably know about all that, and also know the ingredients, so he/she would determine whether the vaccine is safe for you. If you had someone planning all your meals or something, they would need to see the ingredients, but you wouldn’t.

  • DT says:

    Not necessarily… If you are going to a clinic where they are holding a vaxing day instead of your regular practitioner, and they don’t tell you there’s egg product in it, and you have an egg allergy, things can get messy. 😉

  • DT says:

    By knowing my sources. 😉 I plan to breast feed her exclusively for at least the first six months to a year, and will continue to nurse her till she’s two or three once she starts solids. This will keep up her immunities, by passing on my antibodies and white blood cells. Most of the childhood diseases that get vaxed for are not really dangerous (if contracted in childhood) anyway, so I won’t get all bent out of shape if she comes down with chicken pox or measles.
    I will continue to monitor our food choices as a family, and where we get it, making sure I know who and how my milk , meats and veggies are being raised. I will also make sure that a good percentage of our food is raised ethically and eaten raw, or at least not cooked to the point of having the beneficial enzyme and nutrient content destroyed.
    I’ll let food be our medicine, and make sure we have clean and responsible sources, and not let her wallow in fecal matter. 😛

  • kengara says:

    True, that could happen. Though they might have signs or pamphlets warning about it or something… I dunno, I’ve never gotten a flu shot.

  • kengara says:

    Well, that sounds good… Though from what I’m reading it seems like immunity from breastmilk lasts only a year at most (at least for measles; see here)…
    But here’s something to consider: Even when Ella is old enough that dying of preventable diseases is not likely, she can still get them and pass them to infants who are too young to be vaccinated, who have to rely on the lack of disease around them (herd immunity) to keep them from getting diseases such as whooping cough. I know there was a baby who died in Australia because people around her didn’t get their children vaccinated, and they spread whooping cough to her when she was too young to be immunized 😮 So be careful.

  • DT says:

    Yes, I’ve heard all the risks about that (my child being communicable.) There will always be risks, and the risks from the vaxes gets severely downplayed– such as the risk of contracting the disease itself, along with all the toxins that go into creating the vaxes themselves (and I’m not talking thimerasol here either. Aluminum and most of the other ingredients in most vaccines are just as poisonous, and just as bad.)
    I know that breastmilk immunity doesn’t last forever, but that is part of the benefit of breastfeeding into toddler-hood. Our society holds such a dim view of the practice, and so (relatively) few women breastfeed past 6 months in the West (if they make it that far,) that many of the benefits have been lost or forgotten.
    It’s not that I’m recklessly “taking my chances” (along with the chances of those around me); it is that I genuinely do not have faith in the vaxing system, the companies that create them, nor a government that would dictate that my right to choose how I pursue preventative health measures for my family can be overridden to accommodate a faulty premise; i.e. mandatory vaxing.
    As you can see, it’s not some knee-jerk, fear-based thing for me. I have been thoughtfully (and prayerfully) looking into this for some time (this has been a well researched pregnancy, let me tell you. lol!) I want what is best for my family, and my greater community, but I have severe reservations about conventional wisdom when it comes to health, prevention, and nutrition.
    Frankly, I think they are doing it wrong. 😉

  • kengara says:

    Yeah, I can see you’ve looked into it 🙂 I’m just not sure what’s available out there, so I didn’t know if it mentioned certain things that I thought were important for you to know.
    I know there are some risks from vaccines, though it seems like they’ve been up-played a lot in some places, and the benefits from vaccines outweigh them (if you’re interested, here’s a page-ful of graphs XD), but humans can survive without them.
    Out of curiosity, is this site a good summary of Pasteur vs. Bechamp? http://www.whale.to/p/bechamp.html

  • DT says:

    That link sounds about right. I really need to study more on the subject myself to understand it in full. From my current reading and understanding, it sounds fair, though. I’ve only recently discovered this Pasteur vs Bechamp debate, and was surprised to see how much closer Bechamp’s theories were to what I’d already been discovering in regards to health and nutrition. I’d really like to learn more on the topic to feel completely comfortable with it.
    A good book, from which I have only read excerpts, but need to read the whole thing is Dr. Henry Beiler’s Food is Your Best Medicine. Tom Valentine’s Search for Health, which goes more in-depth into the Pasteur/Bechamp debate, is where I got more info.
    It seems to me that this issue is one more case where TPTB attempt to force the data to fit the “wisdom”, rather than gleaning wisdom from the data. The scientific method is great– when applied in the proper order! lol

  • kengara says:

    That’s interesting, cos my impression of stuff is that, according to that site, BOTH are sorta right, in a way-oversimplified sense. Biology is a lot more complicated than either side; overall health does influence whether certain pathogens make you sick, of course, but some will make you sick no matter how healthy you are. Some are present in everyone but only make those sick who are unhealthy to begin with, and some always cause disease when present in high enough numbers. It’s complicated 😮
    I read some excerpts on Amazon, and Beiler seems to be saying that science has helped a lot with infectious disease but not much with chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer, which generally aren’t caused by pathogens, but rather by lifestyle and such. I can agree with that.

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