Because I woke up at 4 AM: Randomness

August 10, 2009 § 42 Comments

We didn’t get to bed until sometime close to 1 AM last night (or tonight… when you go to bed after midnight and wake up before 5 AM it’s all still “tonight”.) I am not pleased to be awake.

I have been having thinky thoughts about a lot of things lately which may translate into eventual posts. I have been looking into vaccines; why we take them, how we take them, and whether or not it is a good idea, and have come to the resolute conclusion that NO– it is NOT a good idea. I just don’t know if I am up to a full on post on the whole deal. I do believe it is of great importance, and something I should share, but I don’t know if I have the mental faculties right now to pull that one out just yet.

Suffice it to say, I am displeased with the current trend of things worldwide regarding s certain H1N1 vax and its potential global ramifications. Of course, doing your own research is always advisable on such topics, so you can check out www.drtenpenny.com, or Pandemic Flu Online, or VacLib.org among many others. This summary Fact Sheet might be helpful as well.

But it’s not just the Swine Flu vax with which I take issue. I am now opposed to all forms of vaxing– I believe them to be ineffectual and outright dangerous. Take that Pasteur– in yo’ face. You are two for two in my book, Buddy Boy, already having dismissed pasteurization as a valid means of disease control, and now vaccinations as well. Napoleon backed the wrong horse, in my book.

In other news, the battery in the smoke detector in our room is apparently wearing down. It began to chirp– LOUDLY– around 4:30 AM. I HATE THAT. I’m ready to beat the thing to pieces with a large, heavy stick. As soon as Matt wakes up, I am having him Deal With It.

Advertisements

§ 42 Responses to Because I woke up at 4 AM: Randomness

  • flutterings says:

    I am not aginst vaccines, but I think it’s important to not take vaccines unless it is neccessary.
    Example, I have taken certain vaccines, but I will not take Tamiflu eventhough swineflu is spread all over here (though swine flu here is just like our common cold since we have horrible influenza over here – the swineflu doesn’t compare, atleast not the one we have here) and neither will Fredrik. We see no reason for the vaccine, especially since neither one of us concider it safe (medicine/vaccine that don’t have long-term effects sorted out is unsafe in my book).

  • flutterings says:

    Also, because I am getting more and more involved with natural living I just think that is part of it. I don’t want to put anything and everything into my body unless it is neccesary.
    We try to eat healthy (sure, I eat cake too, but generally speaking), eat organic when we can, I don’t eat meat more than about once a week (and many weeks not at all). We will cloth diaper our children, breastfeed untill the children wean themselves as far as possible, I will stay home with the children as long as I can. I am looking into cloth pads (I get allergic reactions to ladies products, and that really shows me it can’t be good for you!) and generally just trying to get into a more natural way of life.
    I have translated that into my clothes as well. I wear Plain dress (preferably organic and natural fabrics, but that is expensive like crazy and hard to come by) and it just feels right to me. It feels natural not to display my body (or, for that matter, wear a bra and shave my legs!) and natural living is just.. a lifestyle, I guess.
    I’m sorry this got so long and probably has nothing to do with your post, I just got rambly and talkative 😡

  • ken_redtail says:

    I’m a bit intrigued by the whole vaccine issue and I know that the data supports either conclusion, but with recent anti-vaccine data, such as MMR causing autism, being exposed as a hoax, I find myself erring on the side of caution.
    I myself have received MMR, smallpox, anthrax and a few other vaccines and have not experienced any adverse side effects resulting from them, so they can’t be all that bad.
    Vaccines SEEM to work as polio was near eradicated at the same time as the vaccine was introduced and I refuse to believe it was a coincidence.
    However, I believe vaccinations are effective for only a few types of diseases and is not the preventive panacea people cling to. Beyond that, our bodies are adapting themselves to resist vaccinations of various types and I believe we will reach a point where they will be rendered impotent and we will have to rely on a new medical school of thought.

  • We’ll have to agree to disagree just a bit on these things. I think vaccination should be situational, just as I do the use of antibiotics (opposed to the current attitude of throwing antibiotics at it whether there’s an infection the antibiotics can kill or not and don’t get me started on the overuse of germicides and antibacterial soaps!) There are some cases — like mine — where vaccination might be warranted. Without the vaccinations, I’d be dead. My immune system simply doesn’t work well enough on its own through a combination of chemo and genetic defects to ward off infections which are a mere annoyance to most people. I therefore faithfully get my ‘flu and pneumonia vaccines as directed and I’ve been vaccinated against almost everything else because it was mandatory when I was growing up. Now, I would opt for it because again my immune system cannot tolerate even a moderate case of the diseases being vaccinated for.
    On the other hand, I never did understand the questionable practice of vaccinating infants for meningitis and hepatitis. Unless the hospitals are dirty, the chances of contracting either of those is relatively slender.
    I won’t be getting the swine ‘flu vaccination; my doctor believes that monster virus which hit us three months ago and took as many months to heal up may have been it. In any case, the vaccine is too new and to unpredictable to introduce to an immuno-compromised patient like me.
    I’ll stab your smoke detector for you; ours do that all the time and the system is linked so that when one chirps they ALL chirp until you figure out which one is low.

  • frodo_esque says:

    I feel very strongly pro-vaccine (not a surprise I’m sure given my background working at the CDC and now the NIH), but it’s very, very important to be aware that the anti-vaccine literature that currently exists is based strongly on anecdotal information. There is not strong scientific proof that vaccine’s hurt children, but there is for the benefits.
    I think the current anti-vaccine wave is dangerous to the well-being of children. Of course those who are vaccinated will be fine, my heart goes out to those who will not be covered.

  • frodo_esque says:

    But what of the fact that entire diseases were wiped off the face of the earth (polio for example) as a result of vaccines? People seem to conveniently forget the immense gains that were brought on by the introductions of vaccines. Millions of lives were saved as a result.

  • kengara says:

    I looked over that fact sheet you linked to… it seems kind of deceptive.
    Example: In the study it linked to showing the effectiveness in healthy children, it said that in children over 2 years old, it only prevented 33% of illnesses, but what the review really said was that vaccines prevent between 60% and 80% of illness from the actual flu. Here’s a link: http://www.cochrane.org/reviews/en/ab004879.html
    Maybe the author of the fact sheet misinterpreted the summary; I dunno. It did say that the vaccines were 33-36% effective against flu-like sickness not caused by flu, so maybe that’s where they got confused.
    For the claims about vaccines in adults, I have no idea where they got 6%: the actual review says the vaccines prevent 30% of flu-like illness, and between 50 and 80% of the actual flu, depending on whether the antigens matched the circulating strain.
    Link: http://www.cochrane.org/reviews/en/ab001269.html
    These inconsistencies lead me to doubt the accuracy of the rest of the claims the fact sheet makes, because it seems it’s being either intentionally misleading, or is just not good at interpreting studies.

  • kengara says:

    “our bodies are adapting themselves to resist vaccinations of various types”
    Really? 😮

  • flutterings says:

    Like I said, if they are neccessary. I concider the polio vaccine to be neccessary 🙂
    Swine flu vaccine? Not so much. Certain others I have been offered over the years (including general influenza and others) – no.
    If I can have a good, healthy life if I got the disease, I don’t concider the vaccine worth it. If I would end up being paralyzed or similar if I caught it – I concider it neccessary 🙂

  • ken_redtail says:

    Lol, ok, ok, I know that’s what a vaccine is, but I meant that the body will begin to work its way around how a vaccine works, that’s all.

  • kengara says:

    No, I understood what you meant… that our bodies are changing so that vaccines won’t work anymore. I hadn’t heard about that, and wanted to know what/where you had heard about it. I wasn’t being sarcastic or anything XD

  • ladyfaith3 says:

    I laughed at your smoke detector troubles! That has happened to us too!
    I vaccinated Jorri but stopped and then did not vaccinate Jabin… 🙂 I agree with you

  • I’m in the pro-vaccine camp. I had mumps as a child – being in the pre-MMR generation – and it wasn’t nice. But, because MMR came along afterwards, the pictures that my GP dad took of me with mumps are still – 25 years on – being used in British medical journals to illustrate mumps. Because until the autism controversy, the vaccine helped minimise the disease to such an extent that it had become extremely rare. I’d much rather have had the vaccine. Things like the annual flu jabs that are given to the “at-risk” groups in the UK really help prevent what is, every year and not just when there’s a pandemic on, a potentially fatal illness. And others have mentioned polio. By and large vaccines are not dangerous.

  • lijuun says:

    I love Dr. Tenpenny! I read a lot of her stuff. But her link isn’t working.
    I am absolutely against vaccinations of any kind right now, but not because I think they’re bad – because I don’t trust the companies who make the vaccinations. Honestly, I think Pasteur did great things and quite a lot of things have been eradicated by vacs (like polio, mentioned above). I just don’t trust the things they put into modern vaccinations and refuse to get them.

  • hannahsarah says:

    Polio is still quite epidemic in some areas, especially in Egypt, southern Israel and parts of Africa. There is a lot of resistance to health care workers because their local imams have been telling them that the polio vaccine is a Jewish plot to make Muslim men sterile, and also to spread AIDS.
    I really wish I’d just made that up. :-/

  • hannahsarah says:

    Our bodies are not changing. Over time, the few resistant strains of diseases start mutating and finding ways to work around the vaccines. The weaker strains are killed off, the stronger ones survive. Also, viruses mutate in random, unpredictable ways so vaccines always need to be evaluated for effectiveness. If something worked 50 years ago, and doesn’t work so great now, that doesn’t mean that the vaccine is “bad”, or that people are somehow mutating into something else, it’s just that things on the micro scale tend to evolve very quickly to adapt to their environment.

  • hannahsarah says:

    Many forms of hepatitis can survive for up to 6 months in a hostile environment (like a countertop) and still be contagious. You can get some types of hep from tainted food, sharp objects, poor hygiene and other not quite clean places. My ex’s little brother almost died of meningitis when he was 2 months old.
    I’m just not willing to take those kinds of chances, and I don’t see that the risk outweigh the benefits.

  • kengara says:

    Yeah, that’s always been happening, but it doesn’t mean vaccines in general will stop working; we just keep having to make new ones. I was wondering if Ken knew about something different.

  • kengara says:

    Here is a better TP link: http://drtenpenny.com/default.aspx
    I’m curious: what is it about modern vaccinations that you don’t trust?

  • frodo_esque says:

    I stand duly corrected, and really– I should have known better since I have friends who work for the STOP Program at the CDC.
    According to the literature” The Americas were declared polio-free in 1994. In 2000 polio was officially eradicated in 36 Western Pacific countries, including China and Australia. Europe was declared polio-free in 2002. As of 2006, polio remains endemic in only four countries: Nigeria, India (specifically Uttar Pradesh and Bihar), Pakistan, and Afghanistan.
    Incredible isn’t it what modern medicine can do?
    Unfortunately, religion can cause a lot of people to make decisions that are not for the good of it’s people.

  • frodo_esque says:

    Well that makes sense. =) I can respect that. Just to share, I had the same idea one year and decided to forego the Flu vaccine…while my entire family took the shot. They never came down with it, while I (quite a veteran not only to the world of flu, but also to malaria when I was 12), was absolutely struck FLAT on my back. It was the worst case I had ever had, after which, I vowed not to skip another year. =)
    My experience and decision though, it is completely within your right to not get it. =)
    I suppose I was speaking about parents who don’t want their children to be immunized with MMR, Varicella, etc (which I presume is what Diamond Took was referring to?)

  • frodo_esque says:

    Our bodies aren’t changing in response to the vaccines, diseases (viruses) are. Viruses are very intelligent creatures with DNA that morphs every single season (see The Flu). This isn’t a new phenomenon by any means, but it doesn’t mean vaccines will never be needed. The medical community just manufactures new vaccines every year to accommodate (most) of that years strains (that originate in Asia).

  • frodo_esque says:

    Yup, that’s correct. As I told Ken, our bodies aren’t changing in response to the vaccines, diseases (viruses) are. Viruses are very intelligent creatures with DNA (or RNA) that morphs every single season (see The Flu). This isn’t a new phenomenon by any means, but it doesn’t mean vaccines will never be needed. The medical community just manufactures new vaccines every year to accommodate (most) of that years strains (that originate in Asia).

  • DT says:

    Lol, wow, well, I wasn’t really trying to start a debate or anything… just my middle of the night musings…
    Yes, I do not intend to vax my daughter for anything. But this is a personal decision based on several different resources– really, I should have devoted more time, and included researched info in a full post on the topic as to why I came to this conclusion, but I was being lazy/not thinking/just musing out loud.
    I believe that some folks/families have more sensitive reactions to vaccinations than others, and the fact that all vaxes are pretty cookie cutter one-size-fits-all can be troublesome. I think my family is particularly sensitive, and when looking at current research, and at my own family’s history, I think we are susceptible to severe adverse reactions to vaccines (among other things.)
    It’s difficult to prove now of course, but given our history, it certainly makes sense. Each of the five children in my family were normal babies, but ended up developing severe neurological or auto-immune disorders over the course of our childhood, and that we now struggle with in our adulthood.
    Currently, doctors are beginning to find a correlation between the timing of vaxes and the development of these kinds of neurological responses in children at different stages, and it appears to be cumulative over the course of a person’s lifetime– a lack of an adverse reaction the first couple of vaxes doesn’t mean there won’t be one the fifth sixth or seventh.
    Knowing how sensitive my whole family is in general (allergies, sensitivities, etc) I don’t want to take the risk with my little one for a catastrophic reaction. Also, given the fact that the Pharma companies and the government have secured legal immunity against claims from the public for injuries (or deaths) relating to the vaccines tells me that they are aware of the dangers to the public, and are proceeding anyway.
    I am convinced that the whole vaccinations issue is far more of a political/economic issue than a health concern at this point anyway. But like I said, it deserves it’s own post, with the proper info/resources to back it up. 😛

  • frodo_esque says:

    You have such a prolific and fantastic way of articulating yourself, you should really continue with writing.
    Very interesting point of view, and given your family history and how personal this decision certainly was, I couldn’t stand in the way of your decision. I would certainly agree (scientific evidence or not) that each one of us is sensitive to vaccines to different extents, and that adverse effects could be linked to vaccines.
    There are other reasons of course, which I’m sure you’re aware of. Neurological issues usually don’t exhibit themselves until later on in life, and many times they have a genetic predisposition.
    Determining the cause of various diseases will have scientists employed for a very long time, they can often be head scratchers.
    I can understand wanting to do this in order to potentially save your daughter though. How do you plan on protecting her from the environment? I know you mentioned wanting to home school her, but she will have to be socialized, how will you protect her from the diseases she won’t be vaccinated against? Again, I suppose since the vast majority of the population *is* vaccinated, your daughter may luck out. However, it’s not always that simple since some diseases can be carried via animals.
    Are you worried about this?

  • frodo_esque says:

    Wow, your picture is still used in British medical journals? You’re famous! (sadly, not for something good, but in my world– it’s cool because those journals are well known).

  • frodo_esque says:

    I was wondering if you had some links where I could read some information on this?
    I am certainly not a proponent of pharmaceutical companies by any stretch, but vaccines are monitored by the FDA (they randomly select vaccines from the lot and test them for safety, dose, and other factors). Given how rigorously the FDA and the CDC works to maintain the integrity of vaccines, I’m a little surprised (and curious) to hear this.

  • DT says:

    Oh, Thank you ‘esquey!!
    I am a huge proponent of preventative measures for sustaining health, and while I understand that is the principle behind vaxing, I guess I opt for a more… alternative route. I don’t expect to rely on “herd immunity” for the safety of my child, and I also don’t intend to sequester her away from any and everything, but I do have A Plan. 🙂
    I fully believe that a healthy lifestyle, and eating real whole foods will go a long way in sustaining health. I am a big time supporter of Hippocrates’ old adage, “Let food be thine medicine.” I want to make sure that, as sensitive as our systems are, we are boosting our natural immunities as best as possible through lifestyle and diet. We also see a chiropractor, and our doctor’s office is more naturopathic and “alternative” as well.
    I am doing my best to eliminate harmful chemicals and elements from our day to day life, and any health depleting foods or lifestyle choices are slowly being weeded out. I also plan to breastfeed her for up to three years (or as long as she wants to go) which will give her early years a good dose of protection till her system is strong enough to handle bigger badder bugs. Hygiene plays a major role, as well as letting our immune systems grow with our environment.
    It’s not that I don’t believe in preventing disease, I just don’t think vaxing is the only means of doing so, and if I can do it without harmful chemicals that could shock or destroy my little one’s system, I want to choose that option first.

  • kengara says:

    Yeah, viruses can be pretty tricky, though I wouldn’t really call them intelligent XD though I know what you mean. Fortunately for us, not all of them mutate as easily as the flu and cold viruses do 😮

  • frodo_esque says:

    I don’t know, when you really study it down to the molecular basis, it’s absolutely remarkable how it mutates to overcome seemingly indestructible barriers. It is not ‘intelligent’ by way of a human brain, but in it’s ability to adjust to the outside world and community in a way to ensure it’s survival.

  • frodo_esque says:

    So you think eating healthy foods can combat diseases such as mumps and hepatitis? I can understand the belief that a strong immune system may stand strong in the face of disease– but I’d argue that 100 years ago, people lived as you desire. They ate from the earth (all organic), and held no chemicals in their homes and environment– yet, that did nothing to prevent them from succumbing by the millions to diseases vaccines protect us from now.
    I’m not trying to intentionally debase your argument, I’m actually enjoying this back and forth. I just wanted to point out angles that don’t quite add up for me.

  • kengara says:

    Hm true. Maybe “intelligent” in the way a computer is, or something… it’s all a matter of probability. Though I’ve heard people are working on vaccines that target parts of the flu that can’t mutate very much, so we’ll see what happens 😮

  • frodo_esque says:

    Ooo..I haven’t heard that about vaccines targeted non-mutating aspects of the flu. Very interesting!

  • kengara says:

    Yeah! They looked at the protein sequences of like, all flu strains ever, or something, and found the sections that hardly changed at all, so they can target the vaccine at those sections. I’m not sure how easy that will be, but they’re working on it.
    I think there’s also some research on targeting the actual DNA somehow, instead of proteins… I don’t understand how that works, but it might be good.

  • DT says:

    No problem, ‘esquey. I enjoy discussing things with you, because no matter the topic, we always have amiable civil discussions. You’re good like that! 🙂
    I think that even 100 years ago, diets weren’t as… healthy as they could be– particularly in the West. Also, sanitation and hygiene weren’t what they could be. 😛 Overcrowding certainly contributes to disease and the spread thereof, as seen in crowded cities where disease seems to run more rampant. I would prefer to live in a more… rural outdoorsy environment with wide open spaces. Fresh air is awesome.
    Lifestyle plays a big part as well, since some diseases vaxed against, like HPV and Hep B, are (for the most part) STD’s or (in the case of Hep) transmitted through IV drug use. I hope to teach my daughter responsibility and how to make healthy lifestyle choices, so those kinds of diseases are more easily preventable.
    I look at it this way: there are no guarantees in this life. Vaxes pose their own set of drawbacks, health concerns and potential issues. And even *with* optimum vaccinations, there is no guarantee of immunity, especially as diseases continue to change and adapt with each attempt to subdue them.
    Disease will always be with us, it is up to us to conscientiously make the healthiest choices we have available to us and to try to stay out of the way of contracting avoidable illness. As I said before, I believe that it can just effectively be accomplished through natural measures that do not involve injecting ourselves with known toxins and carcinogens.
    My biggest issue with vaxes is the lobby that would insist it is the ONLY means of disease prevention, and that would take away our right to choose whether or not an individual can make sound judgments in regards to one’s health. For folks that are comfortable with vaxing, more power to them; but for those of us who think they are not he be all and end of defense against disease, I believe it is important to retain autonomy and choice.
    Unfortunately, I do not think we are that far off from mandatory vaxing in this country, which scares the dickens out of me. It’s already compulsory in Europe. The US is not far behind.

  • hannahsarah says:

    When I was traveling in Israel, I was advised to get a polio booster if I was going to be spending much time in the south near Eilat, or any place that had a large Arab population.
    Every year Hadassah Hospital gets a few polio cases. They are always Palestinian children. Almost all Israelis vaccinate, and almost all Palestinians don’t. This proves a couple of things.
    1. Vaccines work
    2. Israelis treat Palestinian children in Jewish hospitals.
    Quick, call Myth Busters!

  • pester says:

    I think that non-vaccination is . . . well, it physically upsets me. I wish I could dismiss it as “well, their kids, their risk,” but sadly it doesn’t work that way.
    My area has had two outbreaks and a number of deaths due to collapsing rates of vaccinations.

  • frodo_esque says:

    Sorry I haven’t had the opportunity to reply! As you know, there has been quite a bit of drama on my end right now with my apartment situation. =)
    Anyhow, it was very interesting reading your response, and you’re correct, sanitation played a huge role in the large disease prevalence of the past. Nowadays the increased sanitation (some of which, I hate to say, is due to the chemicals you don’t like) helped tremendously in keeping diseases at bay.
    I hope to teach my daughter responsibility and how to make healthy lifestyle choices, so those kinds of diseases are more easily preventable. This is an argument many women make against Vaxing their daughers against HPV, and it’s within their right to think that way. I have no doubt you will bring your child up to be virtuous and smart about her choices, as long as you’re aware that as children grow older, their sphere of influence widens. This isn’t to say that what she learned at home won’t control the way she reacts to her environment, but teenagers in particular are known to experiment and test boundaries–some more than others simply due to personality and disposition.
    And of course, we can never be 100% sure our children will follow what we tell them…as much as we’d love for that to happen. =)
    Since HPV helps protect girls from getting cancer, it will also forseeably help her even if she chooses to stay chaste and only have sex once married. A male could be infected with HPV and never know it, infect your daughter, and leave her at a higher risk for cervical cancer.
    I’m certainly not trying to argue and change your mind– and I really hope that’s clear. I suppose I’m just thinking about the whole issue and presenting another side that could be looked at.
    I believe that it can just effectively be accomplished through natural measures that do not involve injecting ourselves with known toxins and carcinogens.
    Just an important caveat: a vaccine is not a toxin or carcinogen, it is usually an inactive outer coating of a virus that isn’t infectious at all. Your immune system simply recognizes the outer coating in the virus if it enters in the body.

  • frodo_esque says:

    I’m so sorry to hear about the two outbreaks and deaths that have occurred due to the collapsing rates of vaccination. This was being talked about at the CDC with a lot of worry because it’s found that a lot of people are basing their decisions on optimistic promises/theories that don’t stand their weight in nature. There isn’t evidence out there proving the safety of living vaccine-free, and as you have shown, those that are trying aren’t always succeeding.
    I haven’t found the link, but I know there has already been a nationwide surge in mumps, which is horrifying to me.

  • kengara says:

    a vaccine is not a toxin or carcinogen, it is usually an inactive outer coating of a virus that isn’t infectious at all.
    But what about stuff like the formaldehyde, (ethyl)mercury, aluminum, antifreeze, ether, antibiotics, and table sugar that they sometimes put in vaccines?

  • DT says:

    Yes, the inoculant may not be a toxin, but the carriers they use are.
    I just don’t understand why they use known poisons in order to create the vaccines. Can’t they find another way of making them without detergent, and all the other chemical crap? These are elements that are known to be harmful to humans, and with continued exposure– especially at the aggressive rate with which vaccines are scheduled in infants and small children, it seems incredible to me that folks don’t question their safety more.
    I don’t know if that would make a difference in the overall safety of the vaccines, since a lot of the debate seems to center around not just reactions to the poisons like aluminum, etc, but also the idea that for some folks, inoculation itself can over-tax sensitive systems.

  • kengara says:

    I just don’t understand why they use known poisons in order to create the vaccines.
    Do you have any theories?
    With almost any poison, the amount of harm it does depends on the amount that’s taken in. I mean, for example, take antibiotics. They kill bacteria, right? And bacteria make some of them, seemingly for the purpose of keeping other bacteria away (those that make antibiotics are resistant to their own, of course). But it’s also been theorized that some bacteria might actually use antibiotics, at low doses, to communicate with each other, rather than to kill each other. It all depends on the dose.
    Don’t the people who make and regulate vaccines know that the stuff that goes in can be poisonous? They’ve studied how much of each it takes to cause harm, and have set the allowed dose much lower than the limit. I mean, for some of the stuff people are worried about, the amount children get from all the childhood vaccines is much less than they get from standard household items, like food and even furniture.
    for some folks, inoculation itself can over-tax sensitive systems.
    That would surprise me… There are so many foreign proteins in the environment, and the immune system has to react to every one it’s exposed to. There are–what, maybe 20 vaccines that children are supposed to get? Compared to the thousands of other challenges children face every day (if they’re not in a bubble or anything), vaccination is like a drop in the haystack 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading Because I woke up at 4 AM: Randomness at Cultured Mama.

meta

%d bloggers like this: